ORIGINAL ARTICLE
PUBLIC GOODS IN AGRICULTURE OF THE EUROPEAN UNION. FUNDING AND SOCIAL MEANING
Andrzej Czyżewski 1  
,   Piotr Kułyk 2  
 
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1
Poznań University of Economics Uniwersytet Ekonomiczny w Poznaniu
2
University of Zielona Góra Uniwersytet Zielonogórski
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Andrzej Czyżewski   

rof. dr hab. Andrzej Czyżewski, Poznań University of Economics, Faculty of Economics, Department of Macroeconomics and Agricultural Economics, Niepodległości Av.10, 61-875 Poznań, Poland; phone: +48 61 854-30-31; e-mail: kmigz@ue.poznan.pl;
Piotr Kułyk   

dr hab. inż. Piotr Kułyk, University of Zielona Góra, Faculty of Economics and Management, Department of Human Resources Management in Organisations, Podgórna St. 50, 65-001 Zielona Góra, Poland; phona: +68 328 25 55
Publication date: 2018-07-09
 
Economic and Regional Studies 2015;8(1):5–18
 
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
The aim of this study is to present the social meaning and funding opportunities of public goods on grounds of selected examples applied by Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) by the EU. The study includes data characterizing expenditure connected with agricultural policy of the EU in accordance with OECD measuring methodology. Considered issues start with the public goods conception and their role in bio-economy. Changes in agriculture financial support structure in the EU between 2004-2012 were considered with respect to the assessment of particular tools that serve public goods funding. It was indicated that these tools contribute to their formation as well. Restrictions in financial support of public goods were presented. It was proved that in the formation of CAP in the EU features specific for certain localizations connected with public goods formation are being taken into consideration increasingly.
 
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